Stress in the emergency services - time to call 999?

Rushing to put out a blaze. Breaking up a nasty fight. Resuscitating an unconscious pedestrian. If you were asked which of these situations was the most stressful, you’d be hard pressed to choose between them. No wonder, then, that frontline staff in the emergency services report high levels of stress.

The 2018 HSE statistics show that the occupations and industries reporting the highest rates of work-related stress, depression or anxiety remain consistently in the health and public sectors of the economy. 

As government cuts continue to demand that our emergency services do more with less, frontline staff are finding themselves being stretched further and further. For many, this means more overtime, shorter lunch breaks, and less choice over when they can take their holiday. 

These jobs are inherently challenging, but the additional burdens of renewed public scrutiny and belt-tightening are pushing many police officers, firemen and health workers to breaking point. So what can be done?

Public sector organisations aren’t necessarily to blame for these problems. However, by being aware of the heightened risk posed to their employees, they can help to mitigate stress and help their staff feel better.

Consultation is an important part of this process. If employees have no natural avenue through which to express their feelings, their stress is far more likely to go unchecked, increasing the chances of a poor morale, resignation and breakdown. 

Showing staff that you’re listening to their concerns, even if there is little that can be done, can go a long way to making staff feel supported. Organisations which simply demand their employees to get on with it, without demonstrating understanding or empathy, risk creating an alienating, impersonal atmosphere.

Establishing a workplace culture where people can talk freely about mental health issues is important. Although the problem of stress is a very difficult one for our emergency services to address, ignoring the problem is far worse for all involved.

If public sector bodies can support their staff effectively, their frontline staff can get on with what really matters: putting out fires, preventing violence, saving lives. After all, doing good is why people join the emergency services in the first place.
 


Disclaimer

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Readers should not act upon (or refrain from acting upon) information in this article and related document links without first taking further specialist or professional advice.

Disclosure

Risk Management Partners Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.
Registered office: The Walbrook Building, 25 Walbrook, London EC4N 8AW.
Registered in England and Wales. Company no. 2989025

 


Source

http://www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/causdis/stress.pdf (2018)

 

Risk Management Partners Limited is authorised and regulated
by the Financial Conduct Authority.
Registered office: The Walbrook Building 25 Walbrook, London EC4N 8AW.
Registered in England and Wales. Company no. 2989025.